My 2018 Blood Test Results And TRT Protocol Changes

Greetings from Budapest, Hungary. A lot of you have been asking what my current protocol for my testosterone replacement therapy is. Today I’ll break down my TRT Protocol for 2018 and the changes made based on my latest blood test results.

Just A Second…


Before we begin, I need to stress the following important point:
Please DO NOT use my TRT protocol as your own!

My protocol is based on my doctor’s prescription and has been tailored specifically to me.

We continue to change the protocol on an ongoing basis based on my bloodwork each year.

You need to develop a unique TRT protocol with your medical practitioner based on your own bloodwork.

Please do not “wing it” and experiment on yourself without a medical professional’s help. You could be putting your hormones and health at risk of long term damage and side-effects.

Rather use this as a guide or information source to reference when discussing your testosterone replacement therapy with your medical practitioner.

I’m not just saying this as a disclaimer, but because it’s extremely important.

Let’s get to it.

My 2018 TRT Protocol – Dosage and Frequency

Sustanon/TRT Dosage for 2018

Sustanon/TRT Dosage for 2018

My protocol for the first half of 2018 was almost identical to that of 2017.

250mg (one ampoule) of Sustanon every 10-14 days, or 125mg every 5-7 days.

This is what was prescribed by my doctor.

However, I did deviate from this slightly.

At the start of 2018, I increased the injection frequency to every 3-4 days and decreased the dosage per injection from 125mg to 62.5mg.

In other words, instead having two shots of 125mg every 5-7 days, I had four shots of 62.5mg every 3-4 days.

Basically halving the dose and doubling the injection frequency so that I’m injecting more often, but injecting less each time.

This is the equivalent of 250mg every 12-16 days. So the injection frequency increased, but the total overall dosage remained the same more or less – 250mg, or one ampoule every two weeks.

I did this after seeing numerous reports, data and anecdotal experiences that higher injection frequency led to more stable testosterone blood levels.

While it wasn’t officially prescribed by my doctor, I still did so under the supervision of my medical facilitator.

I responded well to this and stuck with it until my latest bloodwork in July 2018.

Changes To My TRT Protocol In 2018 After July Bloodwork

In 2018, we did two testosterone blood tests. One during the peak, and one during the trough(dip).

The Peak Results

My peak blood test was done three days after my last injection.

During the peak, my total and free testosterone levels were at the top end of the scale. My total testosterone came in at 40nmol/l, or 1154ng/dl. My free testosterone was 0.82nmol/l.

These results fall outside of the top end of the laboratories normal range, but I’ve been assured by my doctor that this is fine during the peak, as long as I’m not experiencing any side-effects.

Also, while some of these results in red fall out of this particular lab’s reference range, they still fall within the non-red/normal range of the lab I used last year. (see my 2017 blood test results for reference)

Blood Test Results During Peak

Blood Test Results During Peak

As you can see on the Nebido calculator below, these levels still fall within the top end of normal range, although they are borderline.

Yikes! We’re getting close to off the charts.

The elevated testosterone also resulted in elevated oestradiol. While elevated oestradiol may be a cause for concern in other circumstances, it is to be expected during peaks. As long as you are aren’t experiencing any side-effects, there is no cause for concern.

The Dip/Trough Results

The dip/trough blood test was done seven days after my last injection.

You will notice that all levels dropped significantly to the lower end of the ranges.
Total testosterone, free testosterone and oestradiol all dropped significantly.

Blood Test Results During Dip/Trough

Blood Test Results During Dip/Trough

This is to be expected. However, these levels are dangerously close to the low end of the normal range (especially free testosterone), putting me at risk of low testosterone symptoms and side-effects.

Adjustments To TRT Protocol Based On Bloodwork

These results tell us that at my peak, my levels are at the top end of the range, but probably slightly too high still. During the dip, they are nearing symptom levels.

According to my doctor, there is no cause for concern here – only a small change is necessary, to address the elevated peak levels.

My protocol was changed from 125mg every 5-6 days to 125mg every 6-8 days.

With my increased injection frequency, that would be from 62.5mg every 3-4 days to 62.5mg every 4 days.

Increasing the injection frequency usually tends to lead to more stable testosterone levels. It may be possible that this has led to higher testosterone levels this year too.

It is also possible that other lifestyle changes I made during 2017/2018 contributed to higher testosterone levels this year, including a massive reduction in alcohol consumption.

My medical facilitator also suggested introducing an aromatase inhibitor to control estrogen, if necessary. However, considering that I am not experiencing any side-effects from the peak oestradiol levels, we decided to wait and continue monitoring the levels for now.

Other Changes – Injection Site

Another change I made to my TRT protocol over the last year is changing my injection site from my glutes to my quads.

This is not going to have any effect on my testosterone levels (that I am aware of), but was more just a matter of convenience and experimentation for experience.

I have done glute injections for many years, since starting testosterone replacement therapy.

I had heard about other injection sites like the quads, the deltoids and the stomach. I was just too shit-scared to try them out.

I decided to confront my fears in 2018 and try out quad injections.

It was a great decision. Especially for smaller, more frequent injections.

Quads are more convenient. Easy to access and less pain once you’ve found the sweet spot. I highly recommend, if your doctor supports this.

I also have a full guide on how to do quad injections on YouTube for those interested.

Conclusion

Very minor changes were made to my TRT protocol this year. Mostly to address the peak blood hormone levels at the top end of the range.

I appear to be responding well to increased injections with smaller doses.

Other lifestyle changes I’ve made this last year may also be contributing to higher testosterone levels.

As always, the most important factor to consider is that your symptoms of low testosterone remain resolved and that you have a general feeling of well-being.

If you have any questions regarding these results, feel free to leave a comment below.

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Paolo Broccardo

I help men take control of their testosterone, health and lives. Testosterone Replacement Therapy turned my life around and my goal is to help as many men with low testosterone do the same! Thanks to TRT, I traded anxiety, depression and weakness for courage, motivation, strength, love and masculinity. I'd love to help you do the same.

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